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Category: Skills

When Culture Shifts, Don’t Stop Learning

Moments in history always bring about changes to our culture. The way we interact digitally. How we do business. Our political system.

Having been born in 1980, it seems like every 10 years there’s an even on historical significance that takes place.

In 1988 it was the Gulf War. In 1999 it was W2K and then 9/11 in 2001. In 2008 to 2009 it was the financial crisis. And this year, 2020, the Coronavirus.

As time moves on its not just the new technology we need to understand better. It’s knowing how to effectively utilize these new tools to add value to the world around us.

Zoom has proved to be a beneficial tool for remote work during the COVID-19 quarantine. Still we need to learn how to use Zoom correctly to get the best out of it.

Additionally for leaders and managers how do we efficiently add software like Zoom into daily team operations and ensure it doesn’t become a hindrance to productivity?

What skills will now be in high demand? How will buyers you’re marketing to make their purchases going forward? What financial investments will be good bets in the next 5-10 years?

We can only answer these questions by giving our lives over to the process of continual education. Read, listen, discuss, work, and repeat.

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The Power of Asking

Two months ago I took a business trip to see a client in the U.S. Due to a booking technicality, my ticket was split between business class flying out and economy flying back home.

I’m usually not one to make a fuss so I left it. However, my travel partner had business class booked both ways and insisted I tried to upgrade.

After a few attempts over the phone with the agent, I was getting nowhere and concluded it wasn’t to be. My standard bag of roasted almonds was waiting for in the back of the plane while my coworker would dine with a glass of cabernet and shrimp.

When we arrived at our gate he nudged me again to ask the airline employee about any empty seats in business class. I reluctantly walked up and asked (they had called me up for a passenger screening anyway).

The airline employee happily advised me they were trying to move passengers up closer to the front of the plane to balance the weight and that there was one empty seat left in business class I could take. The one next to my coworker.

The upgrade ended up being free of charge.

Asking is such an underrated skill because we really don’t believe there’s a 50-50 chance we’ll get exactly what we were looking for.

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